How To Use The Spanish Verb Parecer

This lesson covers how to use the Spanish verb “appear”. This is a Spanish verb that students sometimes have trouble with, because it is used in different ways and with different meanings. This verb is Parecer (to seem, to seem, to appear), and you can also use it as a reflexive verb and as a verb with the indirect object. Let’s see each case:

SEEM

I look like

You seem

He / she / it seems

We-how we seem

You / they seem

In this case, we use seem to talk about our impression of someone.

You seem tired, did you sleep well? (You look tired, did you sleep well?)

I don’t know that girl that much, but she seems nice. (I don’t know much about this girl, but she seems nice.)

He seemed very smart, but obviously we were wrong, he has answered most of the questions incorrectly. (He seemed very smart, but we were obviously wrong, he answered most of the questions incorrectly.)

RESEMBLE

I look like

You look like

It looks like (Person)

We look alike

It seems

We use Resembling to compare a person with another person who we think is similar.

Juan looks like his dad, because they are both tall. (Juan is like his father, because they are both tall).

Who do you look like in your family? (Who do you look like in your family?)

I look like my mom and my brother looks like my dad. (I look like my mom and my brother looks like my dad).

When we are not being specific about whether we are talking about personality or physical, we are talking about physical, if not, we usually have to be specific.

My mom loves math, and I’m very bad at math, I hate it. In that we are not alike. (My mom loves math, and I’m very bad at math, I hate it. In this case we are not the same).

APPEAR with indirect object

(To me) I

(To you / you)

(To you / him / her) It seems / n

(To us

(To you / them)

In this case, the verb is used to make opinions.

What do you think of the latest Julio Iglesias CD? (What do you think of the latest Julio Iglesias CD?)

It seems a bit boring to me. (I think it’s a bit boring).

It seems to me + Adjective: It seems good to me. (I think it’s good.)

It seems to me that + Phrase with verb: It seems to me that it has many beautiful songs. (I think it has a lot of nice songs).

As with the verb Like, if after the verb I have a plural noun, I have to use it also in the plural.

What do you think of these photographs? (What do you think of these images?)

They look great to me. (I think they are great.)

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